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Eaton-Peabody Laboratories: Investigators

EPL Investigators have academic ties to the Department of Otology and Laryngology at the Harvard Medical School (HMS), the Division of Health Science and Technology (HST), a joint venture of HMS and MIT, the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT and the Department of Neurology at the Mass. General Hospital.

Research by EPL investigators spans the auditory system from the outer and middle ears to the auditory cortex, and includes several major themes: conductive hearing loss, cochlear micromechanics, mechanisms of otoacoustic emissions, cochlear transduction and synaptic transmission, sensorineural hearing loss, hair-cell and neuronal regeneration, descending control of the middle and inner ears, the neurophysiology of auditory perception, optimization of brainstem auditory implants, and the mechanisms and treatments for human tinnitus.

Investigator
Research Area
Cochlear stress responses
Descending auditory pathways
Genetic control of hair cell regeneration
Middle ear mechanics
Neural coding of sound
Biophysics of hair cells and afferent neurons
Stem cells and cochlear regeneration
Neuroanatomy of auditory pathways
Efferent control and cochlear mechanics
Coding of interaural time
Age-related and noise-induced hearing loss
Auditory brainstem implants; optical stimulation
Hair cell afferent and efferent innervation
Efferent control of cochlear function
Otosclerosis and cochlear drug delivery
Imaging auditory function in humans
Middle ear mechanics
Comparative middle ear physiology
Plasticity of the central auditory pathways
Middle ear mechanics
Cochlear synaptic transmission
Cochlear mechanics and otoacoustic emissions
Cochlear development and regeneration
Cochlear nerve degeneration
Auditory adaptation to natural sounds