Halloween Safety Advice from Mass. Eye and Ear

Mass. Eye and Ear wants the public, patients and their families to stay safe on Halloween. There are several tips that parents can mind to keep their children safe.

  • Avoid masks or accessories that obstruct or block vision, particularly the periphery.  Face paint or make-up is a safer option. 
  •  Always make sure to use hypo-allergenic make-up. Keep in mind that make-up does tend to run so it is recommended to bring a cloth when trick-or-treating to wipe any make-up that may get near the eye.
  • Follow any and all guidelines when using contact lenses. Contact lenses should be prescribed by a doctor. Improper use of contact lenses can lead to permanent eye damage or blindness.
  • Carry a flashlight at all times.  Once the sun goes down, keep it on to see the sidewalk or pathways better.
  • Try not to use any sharp props with a costume.  They can cause damage or injury to your child's eyes, or the eyes of other children if improperly handled.
  • Use reflective tape.  It helps others see trick-or-treaters sooner, rather than later.

Dr. Matthew Gardiner, Director of Emergency Ophthalmology Services at Mass. Eye and Ear, stresses the dangers of using masks and also warns about candles: “Masks can restrict peripheral vision, especially when used in the dark at night.  Many children are injured crossing streets because they cannot see well enough to check for cars. It is better to use face-paint instead.  Also, be careful of candles used in pumpkins or other decorations. Loose costumes may catch fire.”

Mass. Eye and Ear is dedicated to the safety and education of the people in and around its community.  In case of an eye emergency, the Mass. Eye and Ear Emergency Room, located at 243 Charles Street, Boston is open 24 hours a day and 7 days a week.

Founded in 1824, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary is an independent specialty hospital providing patient care for disorders of the eye, ear, nose, throat, head and neck. Mass. Eye and Ear is an international leader in Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology research and a teaching partner of Harvard Medical School. For more information, call 617-523-7900 or visit http://www.masseyeandear.org/.