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2001 Press Releases

September - December, 2001

May - August, 2001

January - April, 2001


Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Patient Selected As Massachusetts' 2002 Olympic Torchbearer

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-4170

Braintree (December 18, 2001) - Bridget Quirk, a resident of Newton, Mass., has been selected to participate in the Salt Lake City 2002 Olympic Torch Relay as an Olympic Torchbearer. Ms. Quirk will carry the Olympic Flame on Thursday, December 27 beginning at the Quirk Chevrolet dealership in Braintree, Mass.
Ms. Quirk is a 12 year-old girl who suffers from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). JRA causes severe joint pain and has manifested itself in her eyes by way of a blinding eye disease called uveitis, which affects more than 115,000 children in the United States. Ms. Quirk has been selected as a Torchbearer because she is an inspiration to others. She is running to support the Uveitis Support Group for Kids through the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and hopes to raise more than $150,000 for medical research equipment.
Chevrolet and its network of dealers will help others, like Bridget, carry the Olympic Flame on its journey across 46 states, 65 days and 13,500 miles to Salt Lake City.
Quirk Chevrolet of Braintree, located at 37 Commercial Street, will host an event at its dealership at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, December 27 to celebrate the passing of the Olympic torch. The Olympic Flame is scheduled to begin its journey from Braintree at 12:30 p.m. The event will include a DJ, raffle prizes, food and light refreshments. For more information please call Mary Leach at 617-573-4170 or Michele Gorham at 617-573-3341.


William E. Gundy Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

Boston (December 17, 2001) - William E. Gundy, a resident of Wellesley, Mass., has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Gundy recently retired from PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP where he was a managing director of business development. Prior to that he was at State Street Bank for twelve years as an Executive Vice President and at IBM before that where he was a marketing executive. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College with a Bachelor of Arts in Economics.
Mr. Gundy currently serves on the Missions Board of Trinitarian Congregational Church and as a director of Massachusetts Family Institute.

 

Joyce Cummings Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

Boston (December 12, 2001) - Joyce M. Cummings has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mrs. Cummings, a resident of Winchester, Mass. and a former professional dietician at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, is currently involved in a number of charities, including Hospice Care, Inc. of Stoneham, of which she is a director, and Winchester Community Music School. She is also a founding trustee of New Horizon at Choate Retirement Community in Woburn, Mass. and past president of the En-Ka Society of Winchester.

 

Douglas R. Stockbridge Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

Boston (December 12, 2001) - Douglas R. Stockbridge, managing director of Huntington Common, a well respected not-for-profit retirement living community located in Kennebunk, Maine, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Stockbridge, a resident of Kennebunk, Maine, has been active within the health care field for twenty-three years.
 


Dietary Supplements Reduce Risk of Vision Loss from Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Same Supplements Have No Effect on the Development of Cataract

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-4170

A dietary supplement of high levels of antioxidants and zinc significantly reduces the risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and its associated vision loss. These same supplements had no significant effect on the development or progression of cataract. These findings from a nationwide clinical trial are reported in the October 2001 issue of Archives of Ophthalmology. The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston was the only center in New England involved in this study.
Scientists found that people at high risk of developing advanced stages of AMD, a leading cause of vision loss, lowered their risk by about 25 percent when treated with a high-dose combination of vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, and zinc. In the same high risk group - which includes people with intermediate AMD, or advanced AMD in one eye but not the other eye - the supplements reduced the risk of vision loss caused by advanced AMD by about 19 percent. For those study participants who had either no AMD or early AMD, the supplements did not provide an apparent benefit. The clinical trial - called the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) - was sponsored by the National Eye Institute (NEI), one of the Federal government's National Institutes of Health. Click for complete story.

 

Pediatric Otolaryngologist Joins Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

Boston (September 24, 2001) - Christopher Hartnick, M.D., a Newton, Mass. resident, recently joined the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary as a pediatric otolaryngologist. Dr. Hartnick is also an instructor for the department of Otolaryngology at Harvard Medical School. His research will focus on children with airway and vocal disorders.
Dr. Hartnick received his medical degree at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. He completed his residency in the department of Otolaryngology at the Montefiore Medical Center and his fellowship at the Children's Hospital in Cincinnati in Pediatric Otolaryngology. Prior to joining the Infirmary, Dr. Hartnick was part of a program in clinical effectiveness at Harvard University School of Public Health.
 

Pediatric Otolaryngologist Joins Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

Boston(September 17, 2001) - Mark Volk, M.D., DMD, recently joined the Massachusetts Eye and Ear as a pediatric otolaryngologist. Dr. Volk will focus on diagnosing children with congenital and acquired airway, ear and head and neck problems, and he will conduct research on improving techniques of tonsil removal.
Prior to joining Mass. Eye and Ear, Dr. Volk was interim chairman of the department of Otolaryngology at New England Medical Center, as well as director of Pediatric Otolaryngology at the Floating Hospital for Children.
Dr. Volk received his medical degree from Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago. He completed his residency at the Loyola University Medical Center in the department of surgery and the department of otolaryngology and completed his fellowship in the department of otolaryngology at the Children's Hospital of Buffalo.

 

Otologist Joins Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

Boston (September 17, 2001) - Robert W. Jyung, M.D., recently joined the Massachusetts Eye and Ear as an otologist and neurotologist. Dr. Jyung will see patients with ear problems such as tumors of the ear and vertigo as well as perform surgery for chronic infections, cochlear implants and skull base surgery.
Dr. Jyung is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. He received his medical degree from the University of Michigan Medical School. He completed his fellowship in otology and neurotology at Harvard Medical School at Mass. Eye and Ear. Prior to joining the Mass. Eye and Ear, Dr. Jyung was assistant professor and director of Otology at the Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

 

Study Shows Snack Foods May Increase Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration, Fish May Decrease Risk

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-4170

Boston (Aug. 14, 2001) - Higher consumption of specific types of dietary fat commonly found in snack foods may be associated with an increased risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness and vision impairment in the United States, according to a paper in the August issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.
Johanna M. Seddon, M.D., lead author and director of Epidemiology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and co-authors found that a higher intake of specific types of fat, including vegetable, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats and linoleic acid may be associated with a greater risk for advanced AMD. Foods with higher levels of these fats overall tend to be highly processed, store-bought snack foods.
On the other hand, diets high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are primarily found in certain types of fish such as albacore tuna and salmon, were inversely associated with the risk for AMD when intake of linoleic acid found in processed and fast foods like potato chips and French fries was low, said Seddon.
"Since the impact of AMD on our growing elderly population is rising, finding means of prevention is of utmost importance. Thus far only cigarette smoking is a well-established, modifiable risk factor. Additional studies of dietary factors might lead to nutritional means to reduce the risk for development of this important disease among susceptible individuals," Seddon said.
Based on the results of this study, the recommendations are to avoid highly processed snack foods and to consume two or more servings of fish high in omega-3 fatty acids per week to lower the risk of developing AMD.
The multi-center study took place at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital in New York, the Wilmer Eye Institute in Maryland, and the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Founded in 1824, the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary is an international center for treatment and research and a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. For more information, call 617-573-3700 or TDD 617-523-5498 or visit www.meei.harvard.edu.


Karen Green Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

Boston (June 7, 2001) - Karen Green, senior partner at Hale and Dorr LLP, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
Ms. Green, a Carlisle resident, has an extensive background in law and was profiled as one of "Boston's Top Women Lawyers" in 1996 by the Boston Globe. Prior to joining Hale and Dorr, she was a deputy United States attorney and chief of staff for the former Governor William F. Weld. Ms. Green is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Harvard-Radcliffe College.

 

Cambridge Resident, Richard Aldrich, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

Boston (June 7, 2001) - Richard Aldrich, advisor to the chief executive of operations at Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
Mr. Aldrich, a resident of Cambridge, also serves on the Board of Directors for Ingenium Pharmaceuticals. He is a graduate of Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, as well as Boston College.

 

MASS. EYE AND EAR RANKED IN TOP THREE HOSPITALS FOR OTOLARYNGOLOGY,
FOURTH FOR OPHTHALMOLOGY, IN U.S. NEWS’ "AMERICA’S BEST HOSPITALS"

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-4170

BOSTON (July 13, 2001) -- The Massachusetts Eye and Ear ranked third in the nation for otolaryngology and fourth in the nation for ophthalmology, according to U.S. News and World Report’s "America’s Best Hospitals" survey.
"All of us take great pride in the belief that the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary provides the best possible health care to our patients," said F. Curtis Smith, president, Massachusetts Eye and Ear. "While I do not subscribe to the survey’s objectivity, it is gratifying to receive this independent endorsement of our quality."
The twelfth annual "America's Best Hospitals" rankings was conducted in conjunction with the National Opinion Research Center, a noted social-science research group at the University of Chicago. The survey assesses hospital care in 17 medical specialties.


Quincy Resident Graduates from the 2001 Surgical Technology Program at Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-4170

BOSTON (May 21, 2001) - Quincy resident Deb Ferrari recently graduated from the Surgical Technology Program at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
The program, which began in November 2000, is a five-month curriculum offered through Mass. Eye and Ear to prepare incoming surgical technicians for the responsibilities of the job.
The program is set up in six stages and includes classroom time and supervised clinical experience in the operating room. A few of the duties of a surgical technician are to maintain sterile technique, set up for operating procedures, and to anticipate the needs of the surgical team.
A graduation ceremony for Ms. Ferrari and six other graduates was held on May 17, 2001, in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear’s Meltzer Auditorium.


Revere Resident Graduates from the 2001 Surgical Technology Program at Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Contact: Mary Leach
617-573-4170
BOSTON (May 21, 2001) - Revere resident Kimberly O’Brien recently graduated from the Surgical Technology Program at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
The program, which began in November 2000, is a five-month curriculum offered through Mass. Eye and Ear to prepare incoming surgical technicians for the responsibilities of the job.
The program is set up in six stages and includes classroom time and supervised clinical experience in the operating room. A few of the duties of a surgical technician are to maintain sterile technique, set up for operating procedures, and to anticipate the needs of the surgical team.
A graduation ceremony for Ms. O’Brien and six other graduates was held on May 17, 2001, in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s Meltzer Auditorium.
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Mattapan Resident Graduates from the 2001 Surgical Technology Program at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
Contact: Mary Leach
(617) 573-4170
BOSTON (May 21, 2001) - Mattapan resident Letitia Gadsen recently graduated from the Surgical Technology Program at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
The program, which began in November 2000, is a five-month curriculum offered through Mass. Eye and Ear to prepare incoming surgical technicians for the responsibilities of the job.
The program is set up in six stages and includes classroom time and supervised clinical experience in the operating room. A few of the duties of a surgical technician are to maintain sterile technique, set up for operating procedures, and to anticipate the needs of the surgical team.
A graduation ceremony for Ms. Gadsen and six other graduates was held on May 17, 2001, in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s Meltzer Auditorium.
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North Quincy Resident Graduates from the 2001 Surgical Technology Program at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
Contact: Mary Leach
617-573-4170
BOSTON (May 21, 2001) – North Quincy resident Deb Garrett recently graduated from the Surgical Technology Program at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
The program, which began in November 2000, is a five-month curriculum offered through Mass. Eye and Ear to prepare incoming surgical technicians for the responsibilities of the job.
The program is set up in six stages and includes classroom time and supervised clinical experience in the operating room. A few of the duties of a surgical technician are to maintain sterile technique, set up for operating procedures, and to anticipate the needs of the surgical team.
A graduation ceremony for Ms. Garrett and six other graduates was held on May 17, 2001, in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s Meltzer Auditorium.
Founded in 1824, The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary is an international center for treatment and research, and a principal teaching hospital in its specialties of Harvard Medical School.
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Malden Resident Graduates from the 2001 Surgical Technology Program at Massachusetts Eye and Ear
Contact: Mary Leach
617-573-4170
BOSTON (May 21, 2001) - Malden resident Jeani Kimpland recently graduated from the Surgical Technology Program at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
The program, which began in November 2000, is a five-month curriculum offered through Mass. Eye and Ear to prepare incoming surgical technicians for the responsibilities of the job.
The program is set up in six stages and includes classroom time and supervised clinical experience in the operating room. A few of the duties of a surgical technician are to maintain sterile technique, set up for operating procedures, and to anticipate the needs of the surgical team.
A graduation ceremony for Ms. Kimpland and six other graduates was held on May 17, 2001, in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s Meltzer Auditorium.
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Mattapan Resident Graduates from the 2001 Surgical Technology Program at Massachusetts Eye and Ear
Contact: Mary Leach
(617) 573-4170

BOSTON (May 21, 2001) - Mattapan resident Marcelles Lambright recently graduated from the Surgical Technology Program at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
The program, which began in November 2000, is a five-month curriculum offered through Mass. Eye and Ear to prepare incoming surgical technicians for the responsibilities of the job.
The program is set up in six stages and includes classroom time and supervised clinical experience in the operating room. A few of the duties of a surgical technician are to maintain sterile technique, set up for operating procedures, and to anticipate the needs of the surgical team.
A graduation ceremony for Mr. Lambright and six other graduates was held on May 17, 2001, in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s Meltzer Auditorium.
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Dorchester Resident Graduates from the 2001 Surgical Technology Program at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
Contact: Mary Leach
617-573-4170

BOSTON (May 21, 2001) - Dorchester resident Renald Joseph recently graduated from the Surgical Technology Program at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear.
The program, which began in November 2000, is a five-month curriculum offered through Mass. Eye and Ear to prepare incoming surgical technicians for the responsibilities of the job.
The program is set up in six stages and includes classroom time and supervised clinical experience in the operating room. A few of the duties of a surgical technician are to maintain sterile technique, set up for operating procedures, and to anticipate the needs of the surgical team.
A graduation ceremony for Mr. Joseph and six other graduates was held on May 17, 2001, in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s Meltzer Auditorium.
 

Eye Safety On and Off the Field

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

BOSTON (April 18, 2001) – More than 40,000 sports related eye injuries take place every year. The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s Eye Emergency Services treated more than 7,000 sports and work related injuries last year alone.
"In the last six months, we have seen more than 80 open globe injuries, not including numerous severe closed injuries to the retina or cornea," explains Subhransu Ray, M.D., Director of Eye Trauma Services. "People come into the Infirmary with many types of eye injuries," he says.
Most common sports-related eye injuries result from the following:
• Basketball
• Baseball/Softball
• Football
• Hockey
• Swimming
"If we could get the message across about the importance of eye protection at the work place and on the playing field, we could significantly reduce the occurrence of eye injuries," Dr. Ray says.
According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology the following eye protection is recommended for these types sports:
• Baseball – polycarbonate or wire face guard attached to helmet.
• Basketball – Sports goggles with ploycarbonate lenses.
• Football – polycarbonate eye shield attached to helmet.
• Hockey – helmet with full face protection
• Paintball – full face protection
• Racquet sports – sports goggles with polycarbonate lenses.
• Swimming – goggles.


Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary Researchers Discover Gene that Causes a Form of Blindness From Birth

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-4170

BOSTON (April 3, 2001) – Researchers at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary have isolated a human gene that causes Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a relatively rare but devastating form of blindness from birth. RPGRIP1 is the fifth gene identified as a cause of LCA. A paper describing the findings will be published in the May issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. The abstract is currently on line at the Journal’s web site.
LCA is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by reduced vision at birth. Within the first few months of life, parents usually notice a lack of visual responsiveness and unusual roving eye movements known as nystagmus. Other eye-related abnormalities in LCA can include deep-set eyes and sensitivity to bright light. Central nervous system abnormalities can also exist in a minority of people suffering from LCA. There is no cure for this disease. While rare, LCA is a common reason children are enrolled in schools for the blind.
Scientists from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s Ocular Molecular Genetics Institute, the Berman-Gund Laboratory for the Study of Retinal Degenerations at Harvard Medical School, and the Department of Ophthalmology at University Hospital in Lund, Sweden, isolated and characterized the entire coding sequence of the new human gene. This gene encodes a protein that interacts with another protein (RPGR), which is defective in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. The newly identified gene, called RPGRIP, is on chromosome 14 and encodes a protein predicted to contain 1,259 amino acids. Previously published work from the Berman-Gund Laboratory showed that both proteins, RPGR and RPGRIP1, are present in the ciliary structure that connects the inner and outer segments of rod and cone photoreceptors.
The Infirmary’s scientific team surveyed 57 unrelated patients who had LCA for mutations in RPGRIP1 and found recessive mutations in three (or 6 percent) of the patients. Patients with RPGRIP1 mutations have a degeneration of both rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina, and early in life they experience a severe loss of central vision that leads to nystagmus.
Thaddeus P. Dryja, M.D., lead author, said the findings are another step in the journey to understanding the disease. "The immediate benefit of this discovery is that the affected patients with these new mutations now know the cause of their condition," he said. "Scientists now have another piece to the puzzle as to why some children are born blind. The long term goal is to develop a therapy," Dryja said.
This work was supported by grants from the National Eye Institute and the Foundation Fighting Blindness.

 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Hires New Ophthalmologist

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

BOSTON (April 10, 2001) – Janey Wiggs, M.D., Ph.D., a resident of Lexington, Mass., recently joined the Massachusetts Eye and Ear as an assistant professor of Ophthalmology. In addition to seeing patients, Dr. Wiggs manages a research laboratory that is working to identify the genes that cause glaucoma.
Dr. Wiggs received her doctorate and bachelor’s degrees in biochemistry from the University of California at Berkeley. She earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School. Prior to joining Mass. Eye and Ear, Dr. Wiggs worked at New England Medical Center.


Infirmary Physician Releases Unique Medical Text

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

BOSTON (April 4, 2001) – Steven M. Zeitels, M.D., FACS, of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, recently published a new book about laryngology. The book, "Atlas of Phonomicrosurgery and Other Endolayrngeal Procedures for Benign and Malignant Disease," provides detailed descriptions of new and state-of-the-art voice-surgery procedures and instruments.
This comprehensive work is the culmination of a decade of investigations that were designed to enhance endoscopic minimally invasive surgery of the larynx. Approximately 1,000 microsurgical images were selected from a library of more than 40,000 photographs. This publication provides the reader with unique perspectives, such as theories underlying the management of performing artists as well as comprehensive descriptions of the historical development of this surgical field.
Dr. Zeitels is the director of the Division of Laryngology in the Department of Otolaryngology, and the associate medical director of the Voice Laboratory at Mass. Eye and Ear. He is also an associate professor at Harvard Medical School. He serves as the laryngologist to the New England Conservatory, Boston University School for the Arts, Boston Conservatory, Harvard Repertory Theatre, and Boston Lyric Opera.

 

Five Infirmary Residents Awarded with Fellowship Honors

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

BOSTON (April 9, 2001) – The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary is pleased to announce the following five residents received the Heed Ophthalmic Fellowship for 2001-2002: Balamurali Ambati, M.D., Sherleen Chen, M.D., Lynn Halpern, M.D., Ivana Kim, M.D., and Erich Strauss, M.D.
The awards, given annually by the Heed Ophthalmic Foundation, provide financial support to individuals accepted into a fellowship program. Nationally, only about 25 individuals are granted fellowships by the Foundation each year. This year, five fellowships were awarded to Mass. Eye and Ear physicians.

 

Infirmary Doctors Listed in Leading Medical Specialists Book

Contact: Public Affairs
617-573-3341

BOSTON (March 20, 2001) – The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary’s leading medical specialists were listed in the most recent edition of America’s Top Doctors, a Castle Connolly guide.
America’s Top Doctors is a consumer-oriented publication used for locating the most specialized doctors in the nation. Physicians included in this guide have continued their medical education with advanced training often accompanied by clinical research.
The following Mass. Eye and Ear doctors were listed in the Ophthalmology section: C. Stephen Foster, M.D., Frederick A. Jakobiec, M.D., Chief of Ophthalmology, Roger F. Steinert, M.D. and David S. Walton, M.D. The following doctors were listed in the Otolaryngology (ear, nose, head and neck) section: Mack L. Cheney, M.D., Richard L. Fabian, M.D., Joseph B. Nadol, Jr., M.D., Chief of Otolaryngology, Dennis Poe, M.D. and Steven M. Zeitels, M.D. The selection process was based on peer nomination. More than 200,000 physicians were asked to nominate the top physicians in their specialty through mail, phone and online surveys.

 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Participates in Children and Health Care Week

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (March 19, 2001) – The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary is one of the Boston area hospitals sponsoring a Children and Health Care day at the Boston Children’s Museum from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. on Saturday, March, 24.
Mass. Eye and Ear will have hands-on learning stations for children and parents, exhibits on anesthesia, the operating room, and general information about the eye, ear, nose and throat. Mass. Eye and Ear’s Child Life Specialist will also be on hand to demonstrate general procedures and answer questions children and parents may have about the hospital experience. The goal is to humanize health care for children and families and teach them how to deal with the stress and fear of hospital visits.
The Boston Children’s Museum is located at 300 Congress Street, Boston. Admission for the event is $6 for children, ages 2-15, children under 2 are free and $7 for adults.


Cohasset Resident, William Smith, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (February 14, 2001) -- William B. Smith, former president and CEO of Telcom Systems, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Smith, a resident of Cohasset, served on the High Technology Task Force for the governor of Illinois, and has served on the board of overseers of ITT College of Engineering and the University of Colorado's engineering department.



Weston Resident, Gordon Silver, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (February 14, 2001) -- Gordon Silver, senior managing director at Putnam Investments, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Silver, a resident of Weston, is a trustee of the Wang Center.

Manchester Resident, Polly Townsend, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (February 14, 2001) -- Polly Townsend, a selectman of Manchester, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mrs. Townsend is dedicated to the cause of hearing research.

 


Ipswich Resident, John Kavanagh, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (February 5, 2001) -- John E. Kavanagh III, chairman of William A. Berry & Son, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Kavanagh, a resident of Ipswich, also serves on the board of trustees at North Shore Music Theatre.


Newton Resident, Phyllis Redstone, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341
BOSTON (February 5, 2001) -- Phyllis Redstone, a resident of Newton, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mrs. Redstone is also involved in the Museum of Fine Arts and the R.O.S.E. Fund.

 

Concord Resident, Robert Rines, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairst
617 573-3341

BOSTON (February 5, 2001) -- Robert H. Rines, an international patent attorney, law professor and inventor, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Rines, a resident of Concord, was honored in 1994 with induction into the U.S. National Inventors Hall of Fame in recognition of his high-resolution image-scanning radar and sonar inventions.

 

Wayland Resident, David Saul, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (February 5, 2001) -- David Saul, senior vice president in State Street's Office of Architecture, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Saul, a resident of Wayland, is responsible for enterprise systems architecture and for the evaluation and selection of future technology at State Street Bank.

 

Infirmary Receives Accreditation for Its Coolidge Clinical Laboratory

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (January 25, 2001) --The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary's Coolidge Clinical Laboratory, recently received full accreditation by the College of American Pathologists' (CAP) Laboratory Accreditation Program.
The Coolidge Laboratory has been awarded the accreditation based on the results of on-site inspections of quality control, qualifications of the staff, safety and overall laboratory management. The laboratory is one of more than 6,000 CAP-accredited laboratories nationwide. The accreditation is valid for two years.

 

Brookline Resident, Carol Sawyer Parks, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (January 17, 2001) -- Carol Sawyer Parks, president and chief executive officer of Sawyer Enterprises, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Ms. Parks, a resident of Brookline, is the director of the Carroll Center for the Blind, as well as a trustee of Newton Country Day School and Suffolk University.

 

Manchester Resident, John Parker, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (January 17, 2001) -- John O. Parker, the founder and chairman of Parker Capital Management Inc., has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Parker, a resident of Manchester, is the president of the board of trustees at Peabody Essex Museum. He is also a trustee of the Charles H. Hood Foundation.

 

Belmont Resident, Henrietta Meyer, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (January 17, 2001) -- Henrietta N. Meyer, a resident of Belmont, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mrs. Meyer is the widow of the former chairman and long-time trustee, August Meyer. She is also a board member of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.


Middletown Resident, David Gladstone, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (January 3, 2001) -- David A. Gladstone, a healthcare financial consulting partner for Arthur Andersen Business, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Gladstone, a resident of Middletown, gained healthcare industry experience while serving as chief financial officer of a community teaching hospital in Connecticut, where he led a financial turnaround effort.

Cohasset Resident, Robert Jordan, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Contact: Public Affairs
617 573-3341

BOSTON (January 3, 2001) -- Robert C. Jordan Jr., a financial consultant at Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co., has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Jordan, a resident of Cohasset, has served on the board of directors of the South Shore Playhouse Associates for the past ten years.


Boston Resident, Jonathan Kutchins, Elected Trustee of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

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BOSTON (January 3, 2001) -- Jonathan Kutchins, a resident of Boston, has been elected to a five-year term as a trustee of the Corporation of the Foundation of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
Mr. Kutchins is the CEO of Exeter Group, a software development and consulting company, located in Kendall Square.